Crane Trust

The bad weather that hit Laramie did not have much of an impact on us.  It rained at night but stopped by the time we got up.  Since we had already hooked up the truck and put most of the stuff away the night before, we got a quick start in the morning.  We drove slightly over 400 miles from Laramie, WY to around Grand Island, Nebraska.  As we drove further east, there was more and more traffic.  Since it was all interstate driving, it was easy and pretty boring.   It’s green around our campground here and the weather is beautiful.

I visited the Crane Trust Nature and Visitor Center today.  It is located by the Platte River.  One of the reasons that I wanted to come through Nebraska is because I wanted another look at the Platte River.  I was aware that there is a big migration of cranes here in the spring and now is not the right time to see cranes.  But, I figured I would take a look at the Visitor Center anyway.  I learned a lot about the cranes and now I want to make definite plans to come back here next March.  During the spring migration, almost all the cranes going through the central flyway stop within a 15 mile stretch of the Platte River and Crane Trust manages some of the property for conservation purposes.  About 500,000 sandhill cranes are here within that period.  According to one of the fact sheets at the Visitor Center, “National Geographic calls the annual migration of sandhill cranes one of North America’s greatest wildlife phenomena.”  Although I had heard about it, I got to watch some awesome video in the Visitor Center that clinches my desire to see it sooner rather than later.

The Crane Trust manages habitat to support cranes and other migratory birds and some of that includes prairie grasslands.  They recently acquired a herd of genetically pure bison to place on the prairie grasslands to attempt to help re-create the natural habitat.

They have some trails going through their property, including through some grasslands.  I attempted to hike the path alone.  Dogs are not allowed (which I understand), so Regis stayed at the RV with Dart.  I saw more dragonflies today than I have ever seen before.  It was an interesting experience to hike through the prairie and I got lost.  I just turned around and went back the way I came.  I hike much better with Regis because he follows trails better than I do.  Dart is also better than me.  Without them, I don’t do as well.

We don’t have specific plans for tomorrow, so unless something cool happens, I probably won’t post.  The day after tomorrow, we will head to Kansas City, Missouri.

Flower in prairie grasslands managed by the Crane Trust in Nebraska
Flower in prairie grasslands managed by the Crane Trust in Nebraska
Bird in prairie grasslands managed by the Crane Trust in Nebraska
Bird in prairie grasslands managed by the Crane Trust in Nebraska
Plant in prairie grasslands managed by the Crane Trust in Nebraska
Plant in prairie grasslands managed by the Crane Trust in Nebraska
Bird in prairie grasslands managed by Crane Trust in Nebraska
Bird in prairie grasslands managed by Crane Trust in Nebraska
Platte River in Nebraska
Platte River in Nebraska

For those interested in the ending to my Kindle/iPad saga from an earlier post, I was able to purchase a charger for my old iPad at Wal-Mart and successfully charged the iPad.  Once I got WiFi access for the iPad, I was able to access the book I was reading.  I like Amazon’s Whispersync because the book picked up right where I left off.  My Kindle was still under warranty, so I returned it to Amazon and they have already reimbursed me for it.  I will order a new one when I get home.  I like the Kindle better for reading outside.  I find that it’s better to read the iPad inside the RV (bummer).  I would rather sit outside and read when the weather is nice but I am grateful to have a device to read so I’m glad to have the iPad.

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